City Assembly Chairman, President or Speaker?

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Dragana.BL

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Hello!
Would you please be so kind as to tell me what would be the most correct term to use:
City Assembly Chairman, President or Speaker?
I was challenged by a colleague for using "chairman". His explanation was that a chair practically only chairs a session and that the president of a city assembly has much wider responsibilities than just chairing. Is he right?
Thank you very much in advance!
Respectfully,
Dragana
 

5jj

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The correct term is the one that is used officially for the position. 'President' may be the most important and powerful person in an organisation, or may be a figurehead. Chairman Mao did more than just chair meetings.
 

Dragana.BL

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Thank you very much for such a prompt reply!
All the best!
 

tedtmc

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The head of a city or municipal council is more often called a mayor.

not a teacher
 

bhaisahab

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The head of a city or municipal council is more often called a mayor.

not a teacher

Not necessarily. In most towns and cities in the UK the office of Mayor is a ceremonial rather than an executive position
 

tedtmc

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Not necessarily. In most towns and cities in the UK the office of Mayor is a ceremonial rather than an executive position

And what is the head of the executive called?
 

Rover_KE

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In Manchester (and I suspect in most other towns and cities in the UK), he's the Chief Executive.

Rover
 

5jj

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In some places, the old title of 'Town Clerk' is still used.
 

SoothingDave

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The head of a city or municipal council is more often called a mayor.

not a teacher

No, not in the US. A mayor is a separate elected position, an executive. Those on a city council are legislators. Legislators write laws, executives carry out the laws.
 

5jj

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So Dragan, what we appear to be saying is the a job title means what the people using it want it to mean. You can be reasonably certain what a military rank means, but in business and local government you can never be sure.

Even in the military, a sergeant major is not a major, and the rank of captain in the navy is several grades above that of an army captain; a sub-lieutenant or even a non-commissioned officer may be the captain of a naval vessel.
 

Drear Pooson

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No, not in the US. A mayor is a separate elected position, an executive. Those on a city council are legislators. Legislators write laws, executives carry out the laws.

Not necessarily. The city council where I live appoints a professional "city manager" to be the city's chief executive/administrator. The mayor is an "at-large" member of the council. His mayoral duties are strictly ceremonial (rather than executive) in nature. ("council-manager" form of government)
 

SoothingDave

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Not necessarily. The city council where I live appoints a professional "city manager" to be the city's chief executive/administrator. The mayor is an "at-large" member of the council. His mayoral duties are strictly ceremonial (rather than executive) in nature. ("council-manager" form of government)

OK, live and learn. I suppose I should not have assumed all states were the same.
 
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