disappointed with/ at?

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Tdol

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I generally disappoint myself. And everyone else. ;-)
 

Tdol

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The patron saint. ;-)
 

RonBee

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I'm disappointed in Tdol for being so disappointing.

:wink:
 
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nicolas

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Dear All,

Long time no see :D
I'm too busy recently :cry:

Wow!! You are amazing for teaching me so much about "disappointed"

:?:
But I am a little confused:
Why CitySpeak said : So, you are anointed as the disappointed?
and then tdol answered : The patron saint.

What did they mean here?
Why did tdol answer "The patron saint" ?
 

RonBee

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nicolas said:
Dear All,

Long time no see :D
I'm too busy recently :cry:

Wow!! You are amazing for teaching me so much about "disappointed"

:?:
But I am a little confused:
Why CitySpeak said : So, you are anointed as the disappointed?
and then tdol answered : The patron saint.

What did they mean here?
Why did tdol answer "The patron saint" ?

Starting with "I generally disappoint myself. And everyone else," they were both joking. Tdol is the patron saint of disappointment. Isn't that funny? :wink:

(A patron saint is a saint that "looks after" people (presumably from heaven) and those people are, generally speaking, a particular group. For example, Saint Christopher is the patron saint of travelers.)

:)
 
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nicolas

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Dear RonBee,

Thanks :D

(A patron saint is a saint that "looks after" people (presumably from heaven) and those people are, generally speaking, a particular group. For example, Saint Christopher is the patron saint of travelers.)

Thanks again! :D
 

RonBee

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You're welcome. :D

May I make a suggestion? Say:

  • Please feel free to correct what I write.

The word wrote is more likely to refer to something specific. Use write (simple present) when talking about things in general.

:)
 
N

nicolas

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RonBee said:
You're welcome. :D

May I make a suggestion? Say:

  • Please feel free to correct what I write.

The word wrote is more likely to refer to something specific. Use write (simple present) when talking about things in general.

:)

Thank you ! :D

So if we say "what I done is for you" and "what I do is for you", they are a little different. :D

Thank you RonBee! You are a good teacher :up:
 

RonBee

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So if we say "what I done is for you" and "what I do is for you", they are a little different.

Yes, they are different. One is a grammatical sentence. The other isn't.

:D What I do is for you.
:( What I done is for you.

:D I did it for you.
:( I done it for you.

(You're welcome. )

:)
 

RonBee

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I'm definitely not disappointed in Caseopia.

:D
 
N

nicolas

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Dear Casiopea,

:D
What's the word "schucks" mean?
How to pronounce that word?
I cann't find it in the dictionary :wink:
 

RonBee

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nicolas said:
Dear Casiopea,

:D
What's the word "schucks" mean?
How to pronounce that word?
I cann't find it in the dictionary :wink:

Here: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=shucks
Schucks (rhymes with trucks), in addition to the definition given at that site, is used with humorous intent, as here. It's as if the speaker is slightly embarrassed and saying that he doesn't really deserve the compliment.

:)
 
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nicolas

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Dear RonBee,

Thanks!
I can find the word "shucks".

:?:
So the word "schucks" is the same with "shucks"?

Shucks! Why don't I know that? :D
 

RonBee

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nicolas said:
Dear RonBee,

Thanks!
I can find the word "shucks".

:?:
So the word "schucks" is the same with "shucks"?

Shucks! Why don't I know that? :D

Yes. I should have spelled it without the c. (But dictionary.com didn't seem to mind.)

:wink:
 
I

infinikyte

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Casiopea said:
Be careful not to dis the appointment :D

Could anyone suggest a most common usage of "dis" ? Is it a proper word? I saw it somewhere used as a verb "dissed" but can't remember the content...
:shock:
 

Casiopea

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nicolas said:
Dear Casiopea,

:D
What's the word "schucks" mean?
How to pronounce that word?
I cann't find it in the dictionary :wink:

It has several meanings. The one I've used is bashfulness.

By the way, the proper spelling is shucks, without "c". I add the "c" to give the word a Yiddish spin: schmuck, schlep, schucks. :D
 

Casiopea

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infinikyte said:
Casiopea said:
Be careful not to dis the appointment :D

Could anyone suggest a most common usage of "dis" ? Is it a proper word? I saw it somewhere used as a verb "dissed" but can't remember the content...:shock:

"dis" is an abbreviation of the word "disrespect". It's considered slang (outdated, I believe). To dis someone or something is to disrespect her/him/it. Speakers conjugate it as follows:

Present: dis
Continuous: dissing
Past: dissed
Passive: been dissed

:D
 
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