established itself as a standard work

hhtt21

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""This work is largely based on the late Professor Emile Legouis's A Short History of English Literature, which was first published in 1934 and which has established itself as a standard work."

Source: An Introduction to English Literature.

I cannot understand the part "established itself as a standard work." Would you please explain it?

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Rover_KE

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hhtt21

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How can we express this idea using attain in an idiomatic way?

Thank you.
 
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GoesStation

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... Which has attained the status of a major work.
 

Rover_KE

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Definitely not.
 

hhtt21

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... Which has attained the status of a major work.

Is this also idiomatic?

"... which has attained a major work status." I think this is easier to say yours because it is more straigthforward.

Thank you.
 

andrewg927

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Is this also idiomatic?

"... which has attained a major work status." I think this is easier to say yours because it is more straigthforward.

Thank you.

This work is largely based on the late Professor Emile Legouis's A Short History of English Literature, which was first published in 1934 and which has attained a major work status.


I don't think the way you wanted to phrase it means the way it was intended.
 

hhtt21

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This work is largely based on the late Professor Emile Legouis's A Short History of English Literature, which was first published in 1934 and which has attained a major work status.


I don't think the way you wanted to phrase it means the way it was intended.

What is the difference?

Thank you.
 

GoesStation

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Is this also idiomatic?

"... which has attained a major work status." I think this is easier to say than yours because it is more straightforward.

It doesn't work. It has attained a certain kind of status. What kind? The status of a major work. If major-work existed as a compound adjective, you could use the hyphenated phrase before "status". It doesn't, so you can't.
 
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andrewg927

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What is the difference?

Thank you.

If you leave out "major," then it becomes "...which has attained a work status." What is a work status? It does not make sense.
 

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Or which has become a classic/standard work/book/reference.
 
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