Have and have been - small question

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Nightmare85

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Hello guys,
I believe I'm aware of the general difference between these two tenses, however, I would like to know your opinion here.
When I use "have been", does it always mean that I'm doing something while talking?
I've been reading a book for 2 weeks.
Two weeks ago I began to read it - of course with breaks - but right now, while talking/writing, I'm reading it.
If it's not the case, do I have to use "have read"?
I've read a book for 2 weeks.
:?:
Usually I always use "have been" in such cases:
I play a game almost every night, that's why I say:
I've been playing this game for a year. although I'm not playing it right now.

Advice, please!

Cheers!
 

euncu

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I read(v2) a book for two weeks. (it took me two weeks to read) I'm not reading it now, whether I finished the complete book or not but I finished reading it.

I've been reading... I still read it.

I play a game almost every night, that's why I say:
I've been playing this game for a year. although I'm not playing it right now.

If you have stopped playing the game, I don't think, it's OK to use "have/has been ..ing". For me, it is " I played this game for a year."

As usual, wait for a teacher's or a native-speaker's opinion.
 

Nightmare85

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Hello and thank you for your answer.
However, I'm not sure if I explained it very well.

Let's say a guy usually watches TV every day.
Later he goes out with me, and I ask him:
How long have you been watching TV?
Should he say:
I've been watching TV my whole life.
or:
I've watched TV my whole life.


I don't think he should say, "I watched TV my whole life", because tomorrow he will watch TV again, as every day.

So should he answer:
I've watched TV my whole life.
because he is not watching TV while talking to me :?:
(He is still outside with me.)

I have the feeling he should...

Cheers!
 

euncu

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Let's say a guy usually watches TV every day.
Later he goes out with me, and I ask him:
How long have you been watching TV?
Should he say:
I've been watching TV my whole life.
or:
I've watched TV my whole life.

Well, I'll change your story a bit if you don't mind.

You paid a visit to a friend of yours and found him watching tv with sore eyes.

You: How long have you been watching TV?
He('d normally say):I've been watching TV since I woke up
He('d jocularly say):I've been watching TV my whole life.

How do you find my version?
 

philadelphia

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*Not a teacher

The main problem with the tenses is you ought to bear in mind there is no real rupture amongst them.

Eg => I have played football for this club for years. I did it; now I am just not playing anymore; and I will not because I do not want to play anymore, if not I would have not used 'have played' but 'have been playing'.
Eg => I have been playing football for this club for years. I did it; now I am still playing; and I will as I use "have been playing" instead of "have played".

In those two examples, it does no matter if for instance I usually do not play in the summers as I do it most of the year -no rupture. Plus, no matter if for example I usually do not play every single days, once a week would be enough -no rupture. Also, no matter if I usually do not play all the day long -no rupture. Therefore, every [single] moments in a tense form one moment, [the addition of] the two tenses form one tense, and all the tenses are gathered into one.
 
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philadelphia

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Hello and thank you for your answer.
However, I'm not sure if I explained it very well.

Let's say a guy usually watches TV every day.
Later he goes out with me, and I ask him:
How long have you been watching TV?
Should he say:
I've been watching TV my whole life.
or:
I've watched TV my whole life.


I don't think he should say, "I watched TV my whole life", because tomorrow he will watch TV again, as every day.

So should he answer:
I've watched TV my whole life.
because he is not watching TV while talking to me :?:
(He is still outside with me.)

I have the feeling he should...

Cheers!

If I will watch the TV, then it should be 'I have been watching TV my whole life'.
If I will not watch the TV, so it would be 'I have watched TV the whole part of my life'.

There is a will from the speaker!
 

Nightmare85

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First off: Thank you, guys.

Well, some minutes ago I was thinking about this topic again.
What do you think about this:
I used to play that game.
A while ago I played it, but I left it, and I will not play it anymore.

I played that game.
A while ago I played it, but I left it, I'm not sure if I will play it again (probably yes.)

I've played that game.
Usually I always play that game (I began a while ago), I play it every day, but since my computer broke some days ago, I cannot play it.
I'll definitely play it as soon as I have a new computer.

I've been playing that game.
Usually I always play that game (I began a while ago), I play it every day.
Right now, while talking/writing, I'm not playing it, but tomorrow I will play it - as usual.

This is, at least, my point of view...

Cheers!
 

euncu

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I've played that game.
Usually I always play that game (I began a while ago), I play it every day, but since my computer broke some days ago, I cannot play it.
I'll definitely play it as soon as I have a new computer.




This means that you, at least have played that game once in your life. I don't think that there is an indication in the sentence that you don't play it anymore.
 

bhaisahab

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This means that you, at least have played that game once in your life. I don't think that there is an indication in the sentence that you don't play it anymore.
I agree.
 

euncu

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Then I have no clue :-(

It is obvious from your posts that you've been putting in too much effort and time to improve your English. There is no need to be disheartened. Just keep on this way and you'll see how all your hard-workings pay off. Learning a language is a lot more complicated and longer process on the contrary of what is thought by some people. Like in all these kinds of processes, sometimes there will be backs and forths but all in all, you'll see the progress you have made. Let it be inch by inch but in a very firm way as you do now, just look ahead for the things you'll learn, and look back for the things you have gained.
 

Nightmare85

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Thanks for your kind words.

I've just finished an online test.
My result was 38/40.

And there were also these questions:

  1. If we want to emphasise the duration of an action, we use ... Present Perfect Progressive
  2. If we want to tell, how often something has happened so far, we use ... Present Perfect Simple
  3. If we want to emphasise the result of an action, we use ... Present Perfect Simple
  4. If we want to emphasise that an action is completed now, we use ... Present Perfect Simple
  5. If we want to emphasise how we have spent our time, we use ... Present Perfect Progressive
(I had to fill in the correct tense.)

I believe that I should go for Present Perfect Progressive, because it matches my example.
(Spending the time with it.)
Maybe I can handle that rule better now; we'll see...

Cheers!
 
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