Having to do

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tufguy

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What does "having to do" mean and how to use it?
 

Rover_KE

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...and how [STRIKE]to[/STRIKE] can I use it? How many times do we have to tell you this?


It means nothing on its own.

You should know by now that you need to put it into a sentence for us to consider.
 

Roman55

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Yes tufguy. You have to do it right.
 

tufguy

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Editing fo this thread

"What does "having to do" mean? How can I use it?
Is it correct? This is how I have to do editing?

Does it mean temporary obligation? Like "you have taken this job so now you are having to do this work in time".
 

Matthew Wai

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The following might be worth your reference.
It's also possible for an ongoing present situation of limited duration: My wife is away this week, so I'm having to pour my own beer.
 

tufguy

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It is similar to "have to do", right?
 

tufguy

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It is same as "have to do". Anyone can be used in the kind of situation that has been mentioned in the previous post, is it right? Please disregard my previous post which was posted in error.
 
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Matthew Wai

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"you have taken this job so now you are having to do this work in time".
I don't think it is an ongoing present situation of limited duration.

I have to quote 5jj again.
The non-progressive form is nearly always correct, and is the safest choice for learners.
 

tufguy

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I have been away from my home for a few days so I am having to do my work on my own. Is it correct?

What is this non progressive form?
 

GoesStation

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The progressive form is "having to do." The non-progressive form is "have/has to do."

Examples:
Tufguy asked a question having to do with the progressive form illustrated in this sentence.

Tufguy asked a question that had to do with the non-progressive form that this sentence employs.

On an off-topic note, congratulations for using the Like​ button in post #5.
 

Matthew Wai

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Tufguy asked a question having to do with the progressive form illustrated in this sentence.
I think it is not the progressive form but a participle modifying 'question'.
 

bubbha

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It would be best if the original poster provide context.

"have to do with" can mean "related to" or "involving":

"We were working on a project having to do with assessing local environmental damage."
"What does your proposal have to do with fire safety?"
 

tufguy

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From Goes station's and Bubbah's comments it seems it means "deal with" or "related to". Is it also correct? Sorry guys but I am still confused, sorry for bothering you again and again.
 
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