He kids with everyone.

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tufguy

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"He likes to joke with everyone."

"He likes to kid with everyone."

"He kids with everyone."

"He deludes with everyone."

Please check.
 

tufguy

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The first is natural.

I don't find the second or third particularly natural. Others might.

The fourth is not possible.

Google also shows second sentences when we search for the meaning of "kidding."
 

tufguy

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Could you please tell is this the only sentence we can use to say that "he likes to joke with everyone?"
 

tufguy

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Google is not the place to look for the meanings of words. Use one or more of the dictionaries at www.onelook.com.

"He likes to kid everyone he’s the big macho tough guy." That dictionary is also showing this.
 

tufguy

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That's fine.

Sorry to bother you again and again but I have a doubt. Earlier you were saying that "he likes to kid everyone" was a wrong sentence. Could you please resolve my query?
 

GoesStation

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Sorry to bother you again and again but I have a doubt. Earlier you were saying that "he likes to kid everyone" was a wrong sentence. Could you please resolve my query?

It's fine, though somewhat informal, in AmE. You could say He likes to kid around​ in the same register.
 

emsr2d2

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I would certainly prefer "He likes to kid around with everyone" in BrE.
 

emsr2d2

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Tufguy, you must learn the difference between incorrect and unnatural.
 

Boris Tatarenko

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Is it OK to say "have a doubt"? I don't know why but it irritates my ears.
 

GoesStation

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Is it OK to say "have a doubt"? I don't know why but it irritates my ears.

It's a giveaway that the writer is not a native Anglophone. Natural English expressions include I have [my] doubts about that, without a doubt, and many others. I associate expressions like I have a doubt with the Indian subcontinent, though I think it's used more widely among speakers of English as a second language.
 

tufguy

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It's a giveaway that the writer is not a native Anglophone. Natural English expressions include I have [my] doubts about that, without a doubt, and many others. I associate expressions like I have a doubt with the Indian subcontinent, though I think it's used more widely among speakers of English as a second language.

Okay, we say "I have doubts".

"Delude" also means the same, right? What is the way to use it in a sentence?
 

Rover_KE

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'Delude' does not mean the same.

It is normally followed by a reflexive pronoun.

Click here and bookmark the site for future reference.
 

GoesStation

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Okay, we say "I have doubts".

That also doesn't sound like natural AmE. You can say I have my doubts and maybe I have some doubts about that. My advice is to avoid using doubt as a noun. You can say I have a question, I have some questions, or most often, I'm not sure (about that/something).
 

Barb_D

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I just want to add one more vote for the "He likes to kid around" as natural.
 

tufguy

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I just want to add one more vote for the "He likes to kid around" as natural.

When we say this sentence, is it compulsary to use "around"?

Is it unnatural to say "he kids with everyone"?
 

Skrej

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When we say this sentence, is it compulsory to use "around"?

It's not compulsory, but it's more natural.

Is it unnatural to say "he kids with everyone"?

I think we've already establish that it isn't very natural.

One natural version you will hear is "He's kidding (around)". Here, 'around' is optional. However, if I were to make this an imperative, and say "Quit kidding around", I would have to include 'around'.

When somebody says something you suspect may not be serious, you can say any of the following:

You're kidding (me).
Are you kidding (me)?
You've got to be kidding (me). (often used to express disbelief, particularly at something absurd)
 
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