hit a team on the counter attack

Kontol

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Javanese
Home Country
Indonesia
Current Location
Indonesia
The verb 'hit' has lots of meanings, could you explain what it actually means im this context?

A huge let off for the Clarets on the half hour mark, as Wolves hit Burnley on the counter attack from a corner, with Adama Traore left one on one with Taylor, however, his fierce right footed shot cannoned off Pope’s cross bar.

 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
' ... hit on the counter attack means turn defence into attack.'
 

Kontol

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Javanese
Home Country
Indonesia
Current Location
Indonesia
Thank you so much. So the verb "hit" here means to turn, doesn't it? Can I replace "hit" with "turn?"

Wolves turn Burnley on the counter attack.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
No.

You could replace 'hit' with 'attack', but then you'd have to replace 'counter attack' to 'riposte'.

The original is smoother.
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Football language contains a lot of metaphor. The primary metaphor scheme is that football is a battle. Imagine the two teams are two boxers boxing, or two knights swordfighting.
 

Kontol

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Javanese
Home Country
Indonesia
Current Location
Indonesia
Thank you. Learning English through football is very interesting. I really enjoy it. By the way, I also hear the commentator say "break on the counter", does the verb "break" has the same meaning as "hit" here?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
You can say break, but you wouldn't use break Burnley; you simply break on the counterattack.
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
I enjoy answering questions about language used in the world of football. It's an extremely rich and interesting area.

The verb break in this context has a similar but far from identical meaning to hit. They are different metaphors. When a teams 'breaks', it means they are in some sense set free of restrictions. In other words, they turn defence into attack, or advance from their own half, where they have been 'restricted' by the opposing team's pressure, into their opponents' half. You might imagine someone being tied up with chains and then breaking free of the bond.
 
Top