No matter which/what

subhajit123

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Hi there, can anyone please correct my writing? I can't decide in the following context if I should use what or which after "no matter". To me what is the right choice. I want your opinions. :)

  • Animated movies are the best type of movies for children. Children as well as many adult people love animated movies so much. Though they don't understand the hidden messages of most animated movies, but they enjoy them. And the best part is that no matter from which/what point you start watching them, they bring smile on your face.
 
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emsr2d2

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I'd use "what" in that specific context.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Hi there, can anyone please correct my writing? I can't decide in the following context whether I should use what or which after "no matter". To me what is the right choice. I want your opinions. :)

  • Animated movies are the best type of movies for children. Children as well as many adults love animated movies so much. Though they don't understand the hidden messages of most animated movies, (delete but) they enjoy them. And the best part is that no matter from which/what point you start watching them, they put a smile on your face.
WHICH OR WHAT:

You're right, what is correct. Use which only if there's a specific set your choosing from:

- Which suit do you like better - the red one or the purple one?
- You've lived in seven countries. Which has the best food?
- I either left my keys at my house or your house, but I don't remember which.

So you can either say What's your favorite fruit? or Which do you like better: apples or mangoes?

BRING OR PUT:

You can use either bring a smile to your face or put a smile on your face.

THOUGH OR BUT:

When you start a sentence with Though, don't put but after the comma.

FROM:

In American English, we'd put the from later: no matter what point you start watching them from . . . .
 
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