pull a monica?

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sky753

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Hello Everyone,

I got "pull a monica" from the Tv Series friends, which mean do something terribly bad. I would like to know here if the phrase is commonly used in daily Enlgihs?:)

Regards

Sky
 

bhaisahab

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Hello Everyone,

I got "pull a monica" from the Tv Series friends, which mean do something terribly bad. I would like to know here if the phrase is commonly used in daily Enlgihs?:)

Regards

Sky
I've never heard it. I've never seen an episode of "Friends".
 

Tullia

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Hello Everyone,

I got "pull a monica" from the Tv Series friends, which mean do something terribly bad. I would like to know here if the phrase is commonly used in daily Enlgihs?:)

Regards

Sky



That's the episode where she's catering a dinner party for her mother, right? (I wish I could say I'd never seen an episode, however they seem to be on the television almost incessantly and they can be hard to avoid.)

If I remember correctly, the phrase only appears in that particular episode, and never became a catchphrase on the show - and it certainly never entered general usage here in the UK, although I can't vouch for whether or not it gets used in the US.
 

riquecohen

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That's the episode where she's catering a dinner party for her mother, right? (I wish I could say I'd never seen an episode, however they seem to be on the television almost incessantly and they can be hard to avoid.)

If I remember correctly, the phrase only appears in that particular episode, and never became a catchphrase on the show - and it certainly never entered general usage here in the UK, although I can't vouch for whether or not it gets used in the US.
I have never figured out the attraction of "Friends," but my students seem to love it. I suppose the phrase refers to some egregious act of which she was guilty, but it certainly hasn`t entered everyday English in the US.
 

Tullia

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I have never figured out the attraction of "Friends," but my students seem to love it. I suppose the phrase refers to some egregious act of which she was guilty, but it certainly hasn`t entered everyday English in the US.


It's possibly the worst show on UK TV for constant repeats.
 

Tdol

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And that's saying something. ;-)
 

birdeen's call

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It's possibly the worst show on UK TV for constant repeats.
God, I thought in civilized countries, like the UK, you never get to watch the same joke twice on TV! Well, that's kind of relieving... ;-)
 

SoothingDave

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Due to Bill Clinton, "Monica" became associated with a different type of activity.
 
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