[Idiom] question about get lost and other similar idioms

hirastikanah

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hi

by looking up oxford dictionary and wikipedia, i found out there are many expressions which means "go away"
get lost, beat it, f*ck off, go away, take a hike, piss off, bugger off, buzz off, take off, ... !!!!

i am soooo confused!which one is the worst? which one you can say to a friend?! which one is more common?!
in my language there are only three idioms for it ...
thanks in advance!
 
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Tdol

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F*ck off is probably the worst of those. There are no fixed rules about what you can and cannot say to a friend.
 

probus

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I have the impression that "take a hike" is almost exclusively Canadian. Am I right or wrong?
 
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Tdol

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I've heard it used in BrE, though not very often.
 

Tdol

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which one you can say to a friend?

Another thing to take into account is the way you say these things- it could be meant in a joky way or it could be very rude depending on the intonation, etc. I would recommend taking care with this sort of phrase- if you get it wrong, you may find yourself apologising to an upset friend.
 

JMurray

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get lost, beat it, fuck off, go away, take a hike, piss off, bugger off, buzz off, take off,

As stand-alone commands to "go away", in my opinion all of these examples are natural except "take off".

I would not normally expect, "You're very annoying, take off!", whereas any of the other phrases would work OK there.

I would also stress the need for caution, as Tdol says.
 

hirastikanah

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hi

thank you all

so:
1- f*ck off is the worst
2- take off is not used in the meaning of "go away"
3- "Take a hike" is used in BrE, but not very often
4- There are no fixed rules about what i can say to a friend
5- the way we say them, could be meant in a joky way or rude

now two questions:
1- what BrE letters stand for?
2- when it comes to be rude, is it possible to sort them from the worst to bad ?!

thanks again
 

Barb_D

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Using the f-word is the worst, as you have been told. In fact, don't use it in this forum again, please.

How rude the others will sound will depend on context and tone. They can all be equally offensive.
 

Tdol

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BrE + British English
AmE = American English
AusE = Australian English
 

Tdol

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2- when it comes to be rude, is it possible to sort them from the worst to bad ?

Not really- different people might have different ideas and the way we say them has a great effect on the strength.
 

hirastikanah

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i am sorry Barb_D, OK.

thank you Tdol for answering my two questions
 

emsr2d2

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Hirastikanah, please ensure that you follow the rules of written English:

- Start every new sentence with a capital letter.
- End every sentence with a single, appropriate punctuation mark.
- Always capitalise the word "I" (first person singular).
- Do not put a space before a comma, full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
- Always put a space after a comma, full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
 
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