Tattoo sentence

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Damian007

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Hello,
I don't speak english very good.
as you can see in the topic title I was thinking about to have a tattoo with this sentence; chase your dreams until you live them.
I was wondering if someone can help me if this is correct ? (Grammatic/spelled)
 

BobK

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'Follow' would be better than 'chase'. When you say you chase something you're implying that it's trying not to be caught! :hi:

b
 

Islands

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To chase can also mean to follow or devote one's attention to something with the hope of attaining it.
'follow' or 'chase' are both appropriate. I think that 'chase' has a more active feel to it.
 
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Damian007

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Thank you both for helping me. Except the difference between 'chase' and 'follow' any more mistakes or strange things in this sentence ?
 

BobK

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To chase can also mean to follow or devote one's attention to something with the hope of attaining it.
I'd be interested to know what dictionary you're using.
'follow' or 'chase' are both appropriate. OK, we disagree. In my view, 'chase' isn't.
I think that 'chase' has a more active feel to it.
I'm not sure what you mean by 'active feel'.

b
PS If you're a teacher please say so in your profile. If you're not, please show a little respect for people who are, especially when contributing to the Ask a Teacher forum, and bear the forum rules in mind - with special attention to the bit about saying you're not a teacher (which for someone who's a Senior Member may be a bit OTT, but not for a Newbie who has only just made it into the teens).
 
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Damian007

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Dear BobK, I would like to know if the other part is correct. Especially dreams become 'them', can I say that ?
Thank you
 

emsr2d2

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Dear BobK, I would like to know if the other part is correct. Especially dreams become 'them', can I say that ?
Thank you

Converting "dreams" into "them" at the end is fine. I hope you'll be posting a photo of your tattoo once you've had it done. ;-)
 

Islands

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I am not a teacher.


Bobk, thank you for bringing to my attention, the requirement to state that I am not a teacher. I had thought that my ‘member info’ profile was sufficient.


You wrote ‘I'd be interested to know what dictionary you're using.’

Please see the following two.

1. Chase. vb. ‘to pursue (a person, animal or goal) persistently or quickly’. Ref: Collins dictionary.

2. Chase. vb. ‘to try hard to get something you want such as a job, prize, or money’. Ref: macmillandictionary.com

In light of these two definitions, I'm interested why you think 'chase' isn't appropriate.

You also wrote ‘I'm not sure what you mean by 'active feel'.’
.
To me, the word ‘chase’ has an energetic, lively and dynamic feel to it.

The word ‘chase’ (in it’s various forms) is often used in sentences that depict action or speed. For example: The dog chased the cat around the garden. I am chasing a promotion at work. The Police were involved in a car chase.


If I want to tell someone to pursue their dreams (without necessarily implying a sense of speed, time or urgency) I would probably say ‘follow your dreams’.
However, If I want to tell someone to pursue their dreams (proactively, with a sense of speed, time and urgency) I would probably say ‘chase your dreams’.
 

BobK

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De gustibus non est disputandum. The key word in 1 seems to me to be 'pursue'.

Definition 2 is a bit nearer the mark, but in this context the dreams are not a prize - they are the vision of a prize. You can chase that, but not the dream itself, it seems to me.

b
 
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