[Grammar] The reasons are twofold, with...

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roscela

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Dear teachers,


I have recently come across a sentence:
"The reasons for this phenomenon is threefold, with poverty being the first."

I don't quite understand the sentence structure, especially the phrase starting with "with". What is the function of "with" here? Is the phrase a participial phrase?

Can I write this instead?
"The reasons for this phenomenon is threefold, poverty being the first."

I would be grateful if any of you can help.


Cheers,

Roscela
 

emsr2d2

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You can omit "with" if you wish. However, there is a problem with the original. It should read "The reasons for this phenomenon are​ threefold ..." The verb needs to agree with "reasons".
 

roscela

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You can omit "with" if you wish. However, there is a problem with the original. It should read "The reasons for this phenomenon are​ threefold ..." The verb needs to agree with "reasons".

Thank you for the reply, but I would love to know why "with" can be omitted.
 

Rover_KE

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It can be omitted because it is unnecessary.

Rover
 

Tdol

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It can be omitted because it is unnecessary.

Unnecessary does not mean it's wrong- you can remove it, but leaving it in is not an error.
 

emsr2d2

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We can say "it is not obligatory" rather than "unnecessary" if that helps. It is optional.
 
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Tdol

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I was just trying to add something. ;-)
 

emsr2d2

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I was just trying to add something. ;-)

Sorry, for some reason I thought I had posted about it being unnecessary! I didn't - you did. I've edited post #6 in light of that.
 
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