[General] The term 'On the Vine'

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flipper

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Every now and then I stumble upon the above term/idiom, used in a non-idiomatic sense regarding fruit or vegetables other than grapes.
e.g. 'tomatoes on the vine', 'blackberries on the vine', etc.

By context, I understand that this is used with fruit clusters still attached to the branch on which they had grown, much like the way grape clusters are often thought of.

Is it the case that any fruit which is still attached to the branch on which it had grown may be referred to as 'on the vine'?

(If yes...), Is there a known historic/etymological reason for the use of 'on the vine' and not 'on the branch/bough/sprig' (or 'on the plant')? Especially so for tomatoes, berries, cherries etc.?

Thanks in advance
Flipper
 

bertietheblue

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Every now and then I stumble upon the above term/idiom, used in a non-idiomatic sense regarding fruit or vegetables other than grapes.
e.g. 'tomatoes on the vine', 'blackberries on the vine', etc.

By context, I understand that this is used with fruit clusters still attached to the branch on which they had grown, much like the way grape clusters are often thought of.

Is it the case that any fruit which is still attached to the branch on which it had grown may be referred to as 'on the vine'?

(If yes...), Is there a known historic/etymological reason for the use of 'on the vine' and not 'on the branch/bough/sprig' (or 'on the plant')? Especially so for tomatoes, berries, cherries etc.?

Thanks in advance
Flipper

A vine is a climbing or trailing plant, in particular a plant of the grapevine family. So if fruit is on a climbing or trailing plant then I imagine you could say 'on the vine'; if not, you could not.

I've never heard of '[fruit] on the twig'.
 
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