[Grammar] twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

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lovecindy

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Just like what the title says, if A is 10 kg, B is 20kg, can I say B is twice as heavy as A or B is twice heavier than A? Are they both right? Do they have the same meaning?

Thanks a lot!:)
 

Barb_D

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These are a very clear way to say this:

B weighs twice what A weighs.
B's weight is twice that of A's.
B weighs twice as much as A.

Focus on the weight, not the "heaviness."
 
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lovecindy

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Yes, I see.
But could you please tell me, are the expressions of twice as heavy as or twice heavier than correct? And I'd like to know whether they have the same meaning or not. Thank you.:-D
 

Barb_D

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"Twice heavier" is not grammatical.

"Twice as heavy" is acceptable, but I feel inferior to referencing the weight.
 

lovecindy

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"Twice heavier" is not grammatical.

"Twice as heavy" is acceptable, but I feel inferior to referencing the weight.

Thank you very much.
By the way, the Thanks key is disappearing? I remember there was one at the bottom of the thread.
 

lovecindy

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one more question, if I have ten students, you have twenty students, can I say your students are twice more than mine?
 

Raymott

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one more question, if I have ten students, you have twenty students, can I say your students are twice more than mine?
I would suggest that you never use "twice more ..." or anything like that. People cannot agree on the meaning. Use "twice as many".

If you original have 10 students, and now you have 20 students, you now have 100% more, or twice as many. If you had twice more, you'd have 30, to most people. (Twice 10 is 20; 20 more than 10 is 30.)

PS The "Thanks" button is gone. You need to press "Like" instead.
 

5jj

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These are a very clear way to say this:

B weigh[STRIKE]t[/STRIKE]s twice what A weigh[STRIKE]t[/STRIKE]s.
Barb is trying to prove that she can make as many typos as I. No Chanec, Brab!
 

Barb_D

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