Using 'doesn't'

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Questions1

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I heard someone use the phrase - "Doesn't everybody", not as a question but instead as a statement in place of the more commonly used "everybody does". Is this right? It seems wrong but I can't explain why.
 

probus

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For example, "I love ice cream" can easily elicit the reply "Doesn't everybody."

It means "Of course you do. Everybody loves ice cream." "Everybody does" is equivalent, but "Doesn't everybody" may perhaps contain a tiny hint of irony or even mockery.
 

Kiwi watcher

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I heard someone use the phrase - "Doesn't everybody", not as a question but instead as a statement in place of the more commonly used "everybody does". Is this right? It seems wrong but I can't explain why.

The reason it sounds wrong is because it is wrong .... Doesn't means does not it and it is a question ... Many people ask questions thinking they are making statements ..
 

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I heard someone use the phrase - "Doesn't everybody", not as a question but instead as a statement in place of the more commonly used "everybody does". Is this right? It seems wrong but I can't explain why.
This is called a rhetorical question. It's a question and requires a question mark. It is quite acceptable.
 

probus

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This is a subtle point about which I am not at all certain. I agree that with the question mark it is simply a rhetorical question. But I think the omission of the question mark is the thing that can give it that little hint of mockery or irony. In my suggested usage it would be spoken with a falling rather than a rising intonation.
 

Kiwi watcher

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This is a subtle point about which I am not at all certain. I agree that with the question mark it is simply a rhetorical question. But I think the omission of the question mark is the thing that can give it that little hint of mockery or irony. In my suggested usage it would be spoken with a falling rather than a rising intonation.
A question is a question right ?
 

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This is a subtle point about which I am not at all certain. I agree that with the question mark it is simply a rhetorical question. But I think the omission of the question mark is the thing that can give it that little hint of mockery or irony. In my suggested usage it would be spoken with a falling rather than a rising intonation.
Do you mean like:
A: I hope she wins.
B: Don't we all.
I'm not sure that is a valid construction.
 

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I heard someone use the phrase - "Doesn't everybody", not as a question but instead as a statement in place of the more commonly used "everybody does". Is this right? It seems wrong but I can't explain why.

That you heard this (rather than seeing it written) is perhaps the reason for your confusion. "Does (or doesn't) everybody?" is an example of subject/verb inversion, and the most common way of forming the interrogative in English.

Everybody does. -- statement
Does everybody? -- question (the "n't" is irrelevant to its being or not being a question.)

So, I contend that this is a question whether or not you perceived a rise in tone. It's an assertion phrased as a question and requires a question mark to be grammatical in text form.
 

probus

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Yes I meant exactly like "Don't we all". And I would remind everyone that in the original post of this thread the questioner explicitly stated that what he heard was a statement, not a question.
 

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Yes I meant exactly like "Don't we all". And I would remind everyone that in the original post of this thread the questioner explicitly stated that what he heard was a statement, not a question.

Not to be argumentative, but "Don't we all?" is equally a question.

We do. / Do we? We don't. / Don't we (all)?

It is indeed rhetorical, in that no response is expected, but it is still a question and should be punctuated as such.

And, that the original poster didn't recognize that the utterance was a question is simply an error on his part. I really can't think of any reason to class this as anything other than a question. It uses the interrogative form, and it can be answered by a simple statement.
 

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My point is that it is a question whether intended or not. Using negatives can sometimes result in saying something unintended.
"Don't we all ?" is also a question. Although some use it as a sarcatic comment.
If this forum is about correct usage then this issue should be sorted.
 

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My point, and my last word, is that questions need question marks when in text form.
 

Rover_KE

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For the second time, Kiwi watcher, please read this extract from the forum Posting Guidelines:

If you are not a teacher, you will need to state that clearly at the top of your post.

Also, for at least the third time, do not leave a space before a question mark.

Rover
 

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NOT A TEACHER

If folk on here are learning to speak English then it should be done correctly from the start.
Often people use rhoterical questions because they are not bold enough to say what they really mean, and make what they mean to be a comment, by leaving it open ended . This leads to the listener/ reader not knowing what was intended. English should be clear, and if a statement is what is intended then a question should not be asked. Doesn't it, is question whether or not an answer is expected or not .
 
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Rover_KE

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Kiwi watcher, if your next post does not state that you are not a teacher, you will be placed in moderation.

Rover
 

emsr2d2

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If folk on here are learning to speak English then it should be done correctly from the start.
Often people use rhoterical (spelling error) questions because they are not bold enough to say what they really mean, and make what they mean to be a comment, by leaving it open ended . (error with punctuation spacing) This leads to the listener/ reader (error with punctuation spacing) not knowing what was intended. English should be clear, and if a statement is what is intended then a question should not be asked. (missing quotation marks)Doesn't it (missing quotation marks), is (missing word) question whether or not an answer is expected or not . (incorrect repetition of "or not" and incorrect punctuation spacing)

I entirely agree that things should be done correctly from the start. On that basis, it is unclear why, after many requests, you still fail to use correct spacing with your punctuation. I have marked above in bold and red every error in your post.
You have repeatedly failed to take note of the requests made under the forum guidelines.
 

Tdol

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Yes I meant exactly like "Don't we all". And I would remind everyone that in the original post of this thread the questioner explicitly stated that what he heard was a statement, not a question.

In speech, the speaker has the option of intonation to say it as a statement or a question, but when writing, shouldn't the rules of writing apply? I don't see that omitting the question mark makes the intonation crystal clear and it may confuse some.
 

Questions1

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Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't at all clear in my original posting and this led to the impression that I'd heard the statement spoken, it was in fact written. Ultimately, if I hadn't been rushed, I could have made the question much simpler by asking whether a question mark would always be required when writing the phrase "Doesn't everybody".

So, I contend that this is a question whether or not you perceived a rise in tone. It's an assertion phrased as a question and requires a question mark to be grammatical in text form.

iannou has probably best expanded on what I was ultimately hoping to elucidate. Is this line of thinking generally agreed with?
 
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