What is the first art language skill ?

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ubrella89

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Hi, wihich is the first beginning language art skill that teach you in elementary school, after the child have learned your ABCs?
 

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Try:

What is the first language skill they teach in elementary school after the children have learned their ABC's?
 

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This reminds me of the time this boy in one of the kindergarten classes at Froebel said, "I know my ABC's." Sure enough, he did. After he finished reciting his ABC's he said, "I know something else." Well, I figured it might be best to save that "something else" for another time, so I never did find out what that "something else" was.
 
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ubrella89

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This reminds me of the time this boy in one of the kindergarten classes at Froebel said, "I know my ABC's." Sure enough, he did. After he finished reciting his ABC's he said, "I know something else." Well, I figured it might be best to save that "something else" for another time, so I I never did find out what that "something else" was.
Hi Tarheel, so in kindergarten a boy learn to recite your ABC's. Then ABC's don't belong to art language skill. Is it right?
 

ubrella89

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Hi Piscean, But the childrea learn to put together meaningful utterances at home, early that thery start Kindergarten. Is it right?
 

Tdol

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Then ABC's don't belong to art language skill. Is it right?

I have not heard the phrase art language skill used. Learning the ABCs is definitely an important language skill.
 

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Hi Tarheel, so in kindergarten a boy learned to recite his ABC's.



He had learned them well enough to recite them. That's the important thing.
 

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Raymott

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Perhaps if we knew why you're asking this strange question, we could help. Have you got some pupils that know their ABC and you want to know what to teach them next? If they can say their ABC, you know that they can listen/hear and speak. You don't know whether they can read or write.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I have not heard the phrase art language skill used. Learning the ABCs is definitely an important language skill.

I thought it meant poetry or singing. Now you all have me thinking it's something else.
 

ubrella89

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Hi, I don't have pupils.I have done this question because I am studing english and I want to have a fluency in reading silently and aloud; so I am interested to what the pupils learn then ABC because the ABC is first tool that a child must know if he want to read.
To Language Arts (also known as English Language Arts)means the name given to the study and improvement of the arts of language.
 

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As others have pointed out, learning the alphabet (or any writing system) really has nothing to do with speaking, it's only for reading and writing. Many people are fluent in a language, and are completely illiterate.

Learning the names and shapes of the letters of the alphabet is the first step, but the next (and critically important step) is learning to associate the specific sounds with letter(s) it represent - recognizing that those lines on a page have a function and value. The first step is called phonics, the second step is called phonemic awareness. Phonics teaches that the lines and squiggles have a specific sound value, while phonemic awareness is the ability to recognize that words are comprised of little chunks of sounds. Put the sounds together in a certain way, and you have a meaningful word.

The next step is learning to combine those sounds into words, and to decode written text into sounds. I've kind of lumped that into one big step, as there are numerous smaller steps such as blending, segmentation, deletion, print skills, sight words, rhyming, syllabification, etc.

Reading consists of four main components - alphabetics (a combination of phonics and phonemic awareness), fluency (the ability to string words together accurately and at a fast enough pace to support meaning), vocabulary (knowing what individual words mean), and comprehension (understanding what the text as a whole is about).

There are various systems of teaching reading - some internet searching will provide you with various books and methodologies. It also helps to have someone give you one of the various assessments, to see what your strengths and weaknesses are in regards to those four main areas. Someone might for example be able to read fluently, but not know what many of the words mean, indicating a weakness in vocabulary. Or, they might know what all the words mean, but have trouble stringing them together to support comprehension, indicating a weakness in fluency.

Generally, the order of progression is alphabetics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Unless you can pronounce the words correctly (alphabetics), then your fluency will struggle. Even if you don't know what a given word means, with strong alphabetics skills you'll still be able to pronounce it.
 

ubrella89

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Hi Skrej, Learning the names and shapes of the letters of the alphabet, and learning to associate the specific sounds with letter(s). it is alphabetic principle, that is activity of phonics. But the first step isn't the phonetic awareness? Because a child know to discrimination single sound (phoneme) in spoken words without that he know the relation between single sound and letter or letter pattern.
Put the sounds together in a certain way, and you have a meaningful word.
this a child do it in understood way.
So, a child, that don't know alphabetic principle, he can only say a spoken word.
The next step is learning to combine those sounds into words, and to decode written text into sounds
is this step called reading?
 
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