1.welcome having to change

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notletrest

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Can we say like this: After so many years with the same firm I did not welcome having to change my job, but it turned out for the best in the end.Thank you for instrutions!
 

2006

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Maybe I didn't read this thread carefully enough, but I don't understand why there is a presumed problem with following "choose" with a gerund. I don't see a problem with that.
 

tedtmc

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Maybe I didn't read this thread carefully enough, but I don't understand why there is a presumed problem with following "choose" with a gerund. I don't see a problem with that.

2006
According to TheParser, the experts say that 'choose' can only be followed by an infinitive (choose to do something) and not a gerund(choose doing something).

Am I right to say that, according to kfredson, those -ing words that I suggested cannot be considered gerunds?
And the sentences I quoted as examples not only 'don't sound horrible' but are in fact correct?
 

Raymott

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2006
According to TheParser, the experts say that 'choose' can only be followed by an infinitive (choose to do something) and not a gerund(choose doing something).

Am I right to say that, according to kfredson, those -ing words that I suggested cannot be considered gerunds?
And the sentences I quoted as examples not only 'don't sound horrible' but are in fact correct?
I'd say you've been consistently right. Others have agreed with you about not seeing a problem.

"I'd choose letting Harry watch the football rather than making him go to bed."

If we speak this way - and many/most of us do - it's largely irrelevant if someone can find a credentialed grammarian who says it's wrong. The argument from authority wears thin if it's unsupported by independent thought and an ability to explain why that viewpoint should be accepted as being right.
 
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joham

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Let's analyse it,here "welcome" is a v.t.,"having to change" is its d.o.According to ALD,welcome cannot be followed by a gerund no matter what aspect it is. Thank for your notice.


LONGMAN GRAMMAR OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN ENGLISH, p743:

verbs of affective stance
verbs attested in the LSWE Corpus:
verb + ing-clause - (cannot) bear, (don't) care for. be concerned about brood over, celebrate, count on, delight in, deplore, detest, dislike, dread, endure, enjoy, be engrossed in, (can't) face, favor, fancy, feel like, hate, be interested inlinterest NP in, like,loathe, love, (don't) mind, miss, prefer, regret relish, resent can't stand, tire of, tolerate,
welcome, worry about


verb + NP + ing-clause - admire, (cannot) bear, (don't) care for, be concerned about, brood over, celebrate, count on, delight in, depend on, deplore, detest dislike, dread,
endure, enjoy, (can't) face, favor, fancy, hate, be interested in/interest NP in, like, loathe, love, (don't) mind, miss, prefer, regret relish, rely on, resent can't stand, tire of, tolerate,
want,welcome, worry about
 

TheParser

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Maybe I didn't read this thread carefully enough, but I don't understand why there is a presumed problem with following "choose" with a gerund. I don't see a problem with that.

********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, 2006.

(1) It seems that all verb lists indicate that "choose" is followed

only by an infinitive. (At least the lists I found on the Web.)

(2) A very experienced English teacher told me two insightful things:

(a) Sometimes it is fine to use a gerund after "choose" -- especially

if the gerund is more noun-like than verb-like.

(b) When I asked her why there is this "rule," she gave me this very good

explanation:

Since infinitives are usually used after "choose," it is in the nature

of rule-making to make a generalization.

(3) Therefore:

(1) Yes, gerunds can be used after "choose."

(2) Learners often feel more comfortable with strict rules. So maybe

(maybe) it is helpful to have them follow the rule (only infinitives)

until they are able to know the difference between a noun-like gerund

and a verb-like gerund. Personally, I still find it difficult to know the

difference.

***** Thank you *****:)
 

2006

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********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, 2006.
Hi TheParser
(1) It seems that all verb lists indicate that "choose" is followed

only by an infinitive. But some members here just don't agree with that. (At least the lists I found on the Web.)

(2) A very experienced English teacher told me two insightful things:

(a) Sometimes it is fine to use a gerund after "choose" -- especially

if the gerund is more noun-like than verb-like. I presume you are referring to the fact that sometimes it is difficult to decide if an -ing verb form is a gerund or not. But usually a gerund is easily identified as such.

(b) When I asked her why there is this "rule," she gave me this very good

explanation:

Since infinitives are usually used after "choose," it is in the nature

of rule-making to make a generalization. Yes, rulemaking often involves generalization, but typical collocation is probably more relevant here.
It may well be more common to say 'choose to swim', but that doesn't mean it is wrong to say 'choose swimming'. So students can be told that a certain collocation is more common but another collocation is also correct.

I agree with Raymott's comment. (#23)
2006
 
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