A and An Sounds

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trricher

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Some students become very confused by two articles "a" and "an". Most times it is as easy as; a,e,i,o,u. If there is a vowel present in the noun you are generally told to use "an". However, there are exceptions. These exceptions are due to "sound-likes". Examples:

An Hour has the silent H... sounds like "our"
A University becomes a tongue twister if you would use "an"
A European has the "your" sound

Remember these are just examples.
 

Tdol

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You also have an before a consonant- an MP, an LLB, etc.
 

Esredux

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You also have an before a consonant- an MP, an LLB, etc.
It could also depend on whether it's an acronym (e.g. a ROT clause) or an initialism (e.g. an ROT clause), right? ;-)
(in the case of a/an ROT clause it could be both)
 
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5jj

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It could also depend on whether it's an acronym (e.g. a ROT clause) or an initialism (e.g. an ROT clause), right?
Yes.

With 'an' MP, we have 'an' because when we say the consonant letter 'M', we begin it with a vowel sound -/em/.
 
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