[Grammar] don't you, do you not

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mmasny

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It's just struck me that I have never heard a question said this way:
"Do not you...?"
I find it a bit strange, as one always hears "don't you...?", so there should be also a full form, I guess?
I sometimes come across "do you not...?", when the speaker wants to stress 'not', but never "do not you...?".
E.g. when I write a letter, I am not supposed to use the contracted forms. So how would I write it?
 

TheParser

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It's just struck me that I have never heard a question said this way:
"Do not you...?"
I find it a bit strange, as one always hears "don't you...?", so there should be also a full form, I guess?
I sometimes come across "do you not...?", when the speaker wants to stress 'not', but never "do not you...?".
E.g. when I write a letter, I am not supposed to use the contracted forms. So how would I write it?
***NOT A TEACHER***You are completely correct: (1) Do you not speak French? (2) Don't you speak French? (3) NEVER: Do not you speak French? (4) The rule seems to based on this analysis: (a) You do not speak French. (b) English allows you to move ONE word to the front. Thus: DO you not speak French? (c) You may not move two words (do not) to the front. Thus, you may not say: DO NOT you speak French? (d) BUT, the contraction ("don't") is OK because it is technically ONE word. Thank you.
 

mmasny

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Oct 3, 2009
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Student or Learner
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Poland
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Thank you too :)
 
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