'Enjoy (it)' - can 'enjoy' stand on its own?

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nyota

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A: I might go for a stroll.
B: Enjoy (it).

Can "enjoy" stand on its own here?
 

Route21

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As an NES, but not an English specialist:

I don't believe that I would personally use "enjoy" on its own.
However, having posted something a recipient may enjoy, in an email or on a website/forum, I regularly use the "chatlish" form "Njoy!"

Regards
R21
 

probus

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Sure it can. It's perfectly acceptable.

I offer my friend a beer. As I am serving it to him he says "Thank you" and I reply "Enjoy." I might even say "Enjoy" if he hadn't thanked me, especially if the day was hot and the beer was cold.
 
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emsr2d2

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In BrE, it's absolutely fine.

- I'm off to the theatre tonight.
- Enjoy!

- My brother and I are going to make a massive pizza for dinner this evening.
- That sounds delicious. Enjoy.

- I have to work a 17-hour shift today.
- Ouch! Enjoy. (Sarcastic)
 

Tdol

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It's a recent addition to BrE, but it has crossed over.
 

probus

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I think it's a fairly recent addition to AmE too. I never heard it in my youth.
 

SoothingDave

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I don't see what is so remarkable. It's an imperative form.
 

probus

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I don't see what is so remarkable. It's an imperative form.

Perhaps the question is whether it can be intransitive, and if so, is this usage new.
 

emsr2d2

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SoothingDave

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Perhaps the question is whether it can be intransitive, and if so, is this usage new.

I see. I would think there is an implicit object, an understood "it" when I hand you a beer and say "enjoy!"
 

emsr2d2

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I see. I would think there is an implicit object, an understood "it" when I hand you a beer and say "enjoy!"

I agree. I also feel there is an implied "I hope you ..." at the beginning. I don't see it as being used generally as an imperative.
 

Barb_D

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I say "Enjoy!" alone without finding it odd as well.
 

Tdol

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It sounded odd at first, but it also sounded good and was always going to catch on- one of those let's break the rules and enjoy it moments.
 

emsr2d2

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When a waiter places my food in front of me and says "Enjoy your meal", I don't take that as an imperative. Again, I feel an implied "I hope you ..." at the beginning.
 

nyota

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The word is so common in everyday language and I've been using it in all combinations i.e. enjoy it, enjoy and enjoy yourself, which at some point reminded me of when I was corrected years back by a non-native English teacher after having used enjoy on its own.
 
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