Geese, louse, goose, lice.

5jj

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Alexander's advice on the pronunciation of the third person singular form of the present tense of regular verbs is the same as his advice on the plural form of regular nouns.
 

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Alexander's advice on the pronunciation of the third person singular form of the present tense of regular verbs is the same as his advice on the plural form of regular nouns.

Are these regular nouns: boys, guys, keys, days? If they are, I think they are "s" is pronounced as "z".
If there are plenty of cases where 's' is preceded by a vowel, but pronounced /s/ - gas, yes, bus, this, and countless others, are there cases where s is preceeded by a vowel and is pronounced as "z" or this rule doesn't apply to nouns?
 

5jj

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Are these regular nouns: boys, guys, keys, days? If they are, I think they are "s" is pronounced as "z".
Yes.
If there are plenty of cases where 's' is preceded by a vowel, but pronounced /s/ - gas, yes, bus, this, and countless others, are there cases where s is preceded by a vowel and is pronounced as "z" or doesn't this rule doesn't apply to nouns?
Alexander's words on the pronunciation of suffixes in nouns and verbs has nothing to do with the pronunciation of other words.

Rabies ends with a /z/ sound, virus with a /s/
 

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Yes.
Alexander's words on the pronunciation of suffixes in nouns and verbs has nothing to do with the pronunciation of other words.

Rabies ends with a /z/ sound, virus with a /s/

Then the rule which applies to "s" before vowels in verbs, according to which "s" is pronounced as "z", doesn't apply to nouns. Rabies ends with a /z/ sound, virus with a /s/, "s"
the "s" is preceeded by vowels, but the pronunciation is different.

The "s" isn't pronounced as "z" if words naturally end in 's' and 'se" in their singular forms.


The rules for 3rd person singular verbs only apply to plural nouns formed with 's', as well as possessives formed with apostrophe+s." And to regular nouns.
Is everything I tried to rephrase correct?
 
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5jj

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Your last post suggests to me that you really don't think about what other members say to you. There is no point in my saying the same things again and again.
 
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Rachel Adams

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Your last post suggests to me that you really don't think about what other members say to you. There is no pint in my saying the same things again and again.

No, please don't think that. I am trying to understand these difficult nuances. I actually copy and paste the explanations I read here. I definitely think and try to understand their explanations. I edited my previous post.
 

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The s isn't pronounced as z in words that end in s or se in their singular forms.

Except for rabies, cheese, tease and a few others.
 

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The s isn't pronounced as z in words that end in s or se in their singular forms.

Except for rabies, cheese, tease and a few others.

I will rephrase to make sure I don't misunderstand. The pronunciation of "s" in third person singular in regular verbs and regular nouns is the same. Only in regular nouns and verbs.
The same rule of pronunciation "s" as "z" applies to possessives formed with apostrophe+s. Mary's "s" is pronounced as "z".
Is everything correct now?
 

5jj

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Unfortunately, your rephrasing does not fully confirm that you understand. Let's try this:

The third person singular suffix of regular verbs
and
the genitive suffix of the singular form of regular nouns
and
the plural suffix of regular nouns

are pronounced:

/s/ after unvoiced consonants (except /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ - hits, Pat's, cups/z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels - hums, Tom's, cans
and
/ɪz/ after /s/, /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/ ,/tʃ/,/dʒ/ - washes, Chris's, ditches


If there is anything there that is not clear, feel free to ask - one question per post!
 

Rachel Adams

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Unfortunately, your rephrasing does not fully confirm that you understand. Let's try this:

The third person singular suffix of regular verbs
and
the genitive suffix of the singular form of regular nouns
and
the plural suffix of regular nouns

are pronounced:

/s/ after unvoiced consonants (except /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ - hits, Pat's, cups/z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels - hums, Tom's, cans
and
/ɪz/ after /s/, /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/ ,/tʃ/,/dʒ/ - washes, Chris's, ditches


If there is anything there that is not clear, feel free to ask - one question per post!

Thank you so much! Regarding vowels it's not clear as sometimes "s" is pronounced as "z" and sometimes as "s" in nouns before vowels. Or do I misunderstand again and "s" is pronounced as "z" before vowels only in verbs? Sorry, but I find it confusing.
 

5jj

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Thank you so much! Regarding vowels it's not clear as sometimes "s" is pronounced as "z" and sometimes as "s" in nouns before vowels. Or do I misunderstand again and "s" is pronounced as "z" before vowels only in verbs? Sorry, but I find it confusing.
We are not talking about the sounds of the letter s before vowels.
 

Rachel Adams

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We are not talking about the sounds of the letter s before vowels.

I am asking about this part in which you explain that the plural suffix of regular nouns is pronounced as /z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels. I am asking about its pronunciation before vowels. Could you please write an example for vowels? You mentioned them in your explanation. In verbs the "s" is pronounced as "z" before vowels. Yes, we are not talking about the "s". But I was wondering if the same rule applies to nouns. For example, in "sees" the "s" is pronounced as "z". In some words "boys", "toys, "the" "s" is pronounced as "z".
 

5jj

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Sorry. I missed a line break in post 30.
/s/ after unvoiced consonants (except /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ - hits, Pat's, cups/z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels - hums, Tom's, cans
and
/ɪz/ after /s/, /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/ ,/tʃ/,/dʒ/ - washes, Chris's, ditches
should have been:


/s/ after unvoiced consonants (except /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ - hits, Pat's, cups
/z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels - hums, Tom's, cans
and
/ɪz/ after /s/, /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/ ,/tʃ/,/dʒ/ - washes, Chris's, ditches

I have not said anything about the pronunciation of the letter s before vowels - or consonants.
 

Rachel Adams

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Sorry. I missed a line break in post 30.should have been:


/s/ after unvoiced consonants (except /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ - hits, Pat's, cups
/z/ after voiced consonants (except /z/, /ʒ/ and /dʒ/) and after vowels - hums, Tom's, cans
and
/ɪz/ after /s/, /z/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/ ,/tʃ/,/dʒ/ - washes, Chris's, ditches

I have not said anything about the pronunciation of the letter s before vowels - or consonants.
This is what I thought ( the letter "s") you meant by "the third person singular suffix of regular verbs, and the genitive suffix of the singular form of regular nouns and the plural suffix of regular nouns." Could you please write it? I mean the third person singular suffix of regular verbs, the plural suffix of regular nouns, and the genitive suffix of the singular form of regular nouns. I thought it's the "s".
 

5jj

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I gave an example of each of those in my last post.
 
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