Have and have got

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AdeExpress

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Hi teachers,
How are you doing?
I have a question...

I'd like to know if this sentece is ok:

>> I haven't any money (It's really weird!!) I've never heard that!!
This means: I don't have any money. (or) I haven't got any money.

>> Have you any money? (Weird!!) I've never heard that either!!!
This means: Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?


Could you please tell if these senteces are ok?????:?::?:

I really appreciate it!!! :)

Ademilson
 

sarat_106

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Hi teachers,
How are you doing?
I have a question...

I'd like to know if this sentece is ok:

>> I haven't any money (It's really weird!!) I've never heard that!!
This means: I don't have any money. (or) I haven't got any money.

>> Have you any money? (Weird!!) I've never heard that either!!!
This means: Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?


Could you please tell if these senteces are ok?????:?::?:

I really appreciate it!!! :)

Ademilson

Both'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession.
So “She has $1,000 in the bank” or “He has got two beautiful daughters”. are correct because both are positive statements . But for negative/questions, use ‘do’ as the helping verb. with ‘have’ as the main verb; and ‘have’ as helping verb with an action/main verb ‘got’, as you have done.
I don't have any money. Or I haven't got any money.
Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?

 

AdeExpress

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Both'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession.
So “She has $1,000 in the bank” or “He has got two beautiful daughters”. are correct because both are positive statements . But for negative/questions, use ‘do’ as the helping verb. with ‘have’ as the main verb; and ‘have’ as helping verb with an action/main verb ‘got’, as you have done.
I don't have any money. Or I haven't got any money.
Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?

Hi Sarat,
I really appreciate your help but you haven't answered my question.
 

Nightmare85

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**Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

Since both "I haven't any money." and "Have you any money?" are not correct English, I would not focus on their actual meanings.
I don't think you can know if someone wants to say:
"Do you have any money?" or "Have you got any money?" when he says
"Have you any money?"
Theoretically, he could mean either.

P.S. "Have you gotten any money?" would be the American version, which should be interesting for Brazil...

Cheers!
 

Jaskin

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Hi Nightmare85,

Could you please explain what you mean by "not correct English" ?

Cheers
 

Nightmare85

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Sure.

For positive sentences we don't need a helping verb (do.)
I have some money.

For negative sentences we need a helping verb.
I don't have any money.

For questions we need a helping verb.
Do I have any money?

Of course everyone will understand the sense if you don't use a helping verb:
I have not any money.
Have I any money?

However, this is not correct.
(Although some teachers say: "Has he friends?" is correct, but I disagree.)

If you don't use Simple Present, you don't need a "do":
I have not gotten any money.
Have I gotten any money?

This is correct, but not the same as the previous example sentences.

Cheers!
 

Jaskin

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hi again

Is then a sentence "has she got any many ?" - present simple or present perfect ? :-? :-?

Cheers
 

corum

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Since both "I haven't any money." and "Have you any money?" are not correct English,

That is not true. Both uses of 'have' above are perfectly grammatical. 'Do', 'have', and 'be' are primary verbs. It means they have functions both as an auxiliary and as a main verb. In stative senses, 'have' is used (generally in rather formal style) as an operator, especially in BrE. There is also the informal have got construction as an alternative to stative 'have'.

I haven't any money. -- BrE formal
Have you any money? -- BrE formal
I do not have any money. -- AmE, getting frequent in BrE now
Do you have any money? -- AmE, getting frequent in BrE now
I haven't got any money. -- BrE informal
HAve you got any money? -- BrE informal

In dynamic senses, unlike in 'have money', 'have' normally has do support, and have got is not used.

Does she have coffee with her breakfast? Yes she does. :tick:
Has she got coffee with her breakfast? :cross:
Has she coffee with her breakfast? :cross:


I would not focus on their actual meanings.
I don't think you [STRIKE]can[/STRIKE] know if someone wants to say:
"Do you have any money?" or "Have you got any money?" when he says
"Have you any money?"
Theoretically, he could mean either.

P.S. "Have you gotten any money?" would be the American version, which should be interesting for Brazil...

Cheers!
 

corum

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(Although some teachers say: "Has he friends?" is correct, but I disagree.)


Disagree? What is the basis of your discord? Did you carry out some corpus-based research recently? Or are you a theoretical linguist? ;-)
 

corum

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hi again

Is then a sentence "has she got any many ?" - present simple or present perfect ? :-? :-?

Cheers

I translate your question into more obvious language. Is 'have' in 'have got' a perfective auxiliary verb that helps the main verb 'got', or is 'have got' a verb idiom, an idiomatic unit?

Let us see what implications the first assumption has. If 'have' is an auxiliary verb, it means 'got' is the main verb, which, in its turn, means we have a present perfect. "Is it correct?", rightfully arises the question. If we have a present perfect, we also have a simple present:

I get money.
I have got money.

The two get's do not match semantically. I would say 'have got' is an idiom and 'has got' is simple present tense.
 

Nightmare85

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No further discussion needed.
 

sarat_106

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Sure.

For positive sentences we don't need a helping verb (do.)
I have some money.

For negative sentences we need a helping verb.
I don't have any money.

For questions we need a helping verb.
Do I have any money?

Of course everyone will understand the sense if you don't use a helping verb:
I have not any money.
Have I any money?

However, this is not correct.
(Although some teachers say: "Has he friends?" is correct, but I disagree.)

If you don't use Simple Present, you don't need a "do":
I have not gotten any money.
Have I gotten any money?

This is correct, but not the same as the previous example sentences.

Cheers!

Nighemare has rightly explained the use of ‘have’ as a main verb meaning possession. You certainly need the helping verb ‘do’ to construct negative and interrogative statements. If some one says ‘I have not any money’ is correct, I have no answer/explanation for him.

Now coming to the expression ‘have got’, it is used as verb having two usages(meanings):
§ (idiomatic) To be obliged or obligated
I have got to do my homework.(obligation)
Drivers have got to get a license to drive a car. (necessity)
§ (transitive) To have or show possession
I have got a new car for my personal use.
Or
I have a new car for my personal use.
She has got three children.
 
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emsr2d2

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No further discussion needed.

Maybe not, but I'll throw my two ha'pennys' worth in anyway. My grandfather still says "Have you any...?" or "Have you...?" Perhaps it's something that has gradually gone out of regular use over the years.

I certainly remember him saying to me, when I was a child "Have you homework today?", or to my grandmother "Have we any coffee?" etc.
 

massul

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Maybe not, but I'll throw my two ha'pennys' worth in anyway. My grandfather still says "Have you any...?" or "Have you...?" Perhaps it's something that has gradually gone out of regular use over the years.

I certainly remember him saying to me, when I was a child "Have you homework today?", or to my grandmother "Have we any coffee?" etc.

Nice ending!
Yet, the term of the 'helping verb' in the above discussions is really new to me. Most Indonesian English teachers call it 'auxiliary verb' instead of 'helping verb' :roll:. However, we, Indonesian people, have 'KATA KERJA BANTU'. This isfrom the translation of 'verb' as KATA KERJA and 'help(ing)' as BANTU. It means 'helping verb' has a closer meaning in my Indonesian language. Still, it sounds weird to me..
Which one is mostly used then?
 

sarat_106

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Disagree? What is the basis of your discord? Did you carry out some corpus-based research recently? Or are you a theoretical linguist? ;-)

Everyone has come to this forum to learn from others including myself and not to get comments indicative of arrogance and harshness. So please try to maintain self-restraint while expressing your discord against any members, in particular who are very keen and serious participants.
.
 

corum

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Everyone has come to this forum to learn from others including myself and not to get comments indicative of arrogance and harshness. So please try to maintain self-restraint while expressing your discord against any members, in particular who are very keen and serious participants.
.

You do not know anything about my relationship with Nightmare. Besides, no one asked you to come up with your moral lesson. There was really no call for it whatsoever. Believe me there was no intended malice in my comment. I trust you will keep all this in mind in the future and that you think twice before you poke your big nose into other people's business.
When I need your teachings on morals, I will let you know. Until then, stay on the sidelines. :)

Everyone has come to this forum to learn from others including myself and not to get comments [STRIKE]indicative of arrogance and harshness[/STRIKE].

...indicative of a good understanding of the English language -- that is more like it. :) I am sure you agree but you are too proud to admit it. This is a thorn in your side: a self-student comes here and proves an English teacher's weaknesses. As I perceive it, people push the 'thank-you' button when they read something that they would like to hear. Or when certain people say it. Satirical! :)
 
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corum

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If some one says ‘I have not any money’ is correct, I have no answer/explanation for him.
:) What do you mean?

I suspect you are in desperate need of a good grammar book:

Read some review of Quirk et al. (1985): http://tinyurl.com/33jjqwz

A-Comprehensive-Grammar-of-the-English-Language-poza-t-D-n-IMG_8771_exposure%20copy_resize_4.jpg


p130; 3.33 (primary verb have) -- Read it carefully! :)
 
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sarat_106

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You do not know anything about my relationship with Nightmare. Besides, no one asked you to come up with your moral lesson. There was really no call for it whatsoever. Believe me there was no intended malice in my comment. I trust you will keep all this in mind in the future and that you think twice before you poke your big nose into other people's business.
When I need your teachings on morals, I will let you know. Until then, stay on the sidelines. :)



...indicative of a good understanding of the English language -- that is more like it. :) I am sure you agree but you are too proud to admit it. This is a thorn in your side: a self-student comes here and proves an English teacher's weaknesses. As I perceive it, people push the 'thank-you' button when they read something that they would like to hear. Or when certain people say it. Satirical! :)


I do not need your advice. Please keep the same with you and finish with it.
 

Tdol

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Firstly, can I just say that I haven't any money is a form that you will hear being used in the UK at least. I have not any money does sound strange, but the contraction doesn't.

Secondly, I am going to close this thread because it is becoming disagreeable to read. Please try to discuss and disagree with ideas and not the people who hold them.

Thank you
 
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