Misses next match

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Nightmare85

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Hey,
Situation (in soccer):
A player got a yellow card in the previous match, and gets a yellow card in the current match.
This means he cannot play the next match.
A message appears:
Misses next match.

Why not:
Is missing the next match. :?:

He does not "miss" the next match, he "is missing" - this is a different case.
I can miss someone.
I can also say, "I have been missing him for weeks".

Cheers!
 

corum

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We can use the simple present to refer to future time.
 

Nightmare85

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Yes, but look, please:
https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/109640-missing-vs-miss.html

Miss: I miss someone (s/he is not here).
Missing: I am missing (I am not here).

If a player cannot play the next match (due to yellow cards), he is missing.

Or do you say:
I cannot miss something that belongs to the future?
I cannot miss a person tomorrow.
I can miss a person now.

Maybe I got your point...

Edit
Important:
It's not about tense.
It's about "miss" and "is missing"

Edit 2
to miss: verb
missing: adjective
In my case I'm talking about the adjective.

Player is missing next match. vs. Player misses next match.

I hope we can solve this puzzle :)

P.S: I'm aware of the fact that the verb can be used with -ing too, but as said, we need an adjective here - in my opinion.

Cheers!
 
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Tdol

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It could be the present simple for very short actions that are right now- he shoots, he scores rather than he is shooting, he is scoring. Also, the act of showing the second card is a performative action (like saying 'I do' in a wedding, where the words are the action) and is complete in itself, so has none of the incompleteness suggested by the progressive form. It could also be like a headline in a newspaper- the simple occupies less screen real estate and does the same job. There may be other reasons- let's see what the football fans have to say.
 

Nightmare85

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Okay, I've just checked my dictionary and it says:
to miss = verb (if someone is missing)

This means miss can both mean, "You are missing someone" (who is not here), and "You are missing" (you are not here).

Well, so now I'm wondering if she was right after all:
P1. "Nice party, but where is Lisa?"
P2. "Lisa is missing."
P3. "It seems she is always missing."
P3: "It seems she always misses."
Is the red colored sentence correct or not?
It should be correct!?
https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/109640-missing-vs-miss.html

Cheers!
 

Allen165

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NOT A TEACHER.

No, the sentence in red is not correct. But it would be correct if you changed it as follows: "She always misses parties."
 

Allen165

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Hey,
Situation (in soccer):
A player got a yellow card in the previous match, and gets a yellow card in the current match.
This means he cannot play the next match.
A message appears:
Misses next match. = Er verpasst das nächste Spiel.
Du hast den Satz so verstanden: "Er vermisst das nächste Spiel.", was aber keinen Sinn ergibt.
Im Englischen kann "to miss" sowohl "verpassen" als auch "vermissen" bedeuten.

Why not:
Is missing the next match. :?:

He does not "miss" the next match, he "is missing" - this is a different case.
I can miss someone.
I can also say, "I have been missing him for weeks".

Cheers!

Hope that helps.
 

BobK

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Hey,
Situation (in soccer):
A player got a yellow card in the previous match, and gets a yellow card in the current match.
This means he cannot play the next match.
A message appears:
Misses next match.

Why not:
Is missing the next match. :?:

....
Look at the context. the TV company could say 'This player, because he has been shown a yellow card in both this match and a previous one, by the rules of the competition will be required to miss the next match'. ;-) But a 2-3 line caption like that would be a bit of a distraction. And as Corum said, the present (both simple and continuous) can be used to represent a future action. In cases involving some sort of competition, it seems to me, it's common. For example, suppose some children are playing a board game, and one competitors' counter lands on a square marked 'Miss a turn'. S/he groans 'I miss a turn', rather than 'I'm going to have to miss a turn' or 'Next time round, I won't have a go.' Or a football coach might say 'That was an unbelievably bad fumble. You're not playing in the next match.'

b

PS The present can refer to more or less any time:
  • [At the end of an argument, conceding defeat] 'OK - you win again': past
  • [At the end of an argument, claiming victory] 'That's a clincher - I win again': present
  • 'Right, I'm getting sick of losing every time. £10 says I win the next argument': future
 
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Jaskin

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hi,
Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker,

I'd just simply say that it is because the "miss" is scheduled .

Cheers
 
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