"Something happened to me." Subject-Object

freijorn

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Hello, I'm studying on sentence structures but I'm having some problems. I've watched approximately ten youtube videos and read four articles but I couldn't find certain answers for my questions. I would like to know whether collocations, prepositions, prepositional phrases, adjectives, and adverbs can be called as objects.
icon7.png



1-Something happened to me. (Is the word "something" a subject here?)
2-She was late. (Can the adverb "late" be called as a object? Is the pronoun "She" both subject and object?)
3-He gave speech in science conference. ( Can the word "speech" be called as object? Is the preposition "in science conference" called as an "object" as a whole?)
4-Out of stillness come the loud sound of laughter. (I assume the word "sound" is subject here. Is it correct?)
5-We danced on the floor. (Can the word "floor" be called as object of the sentence?)
6-This woman will go home after work. (Is the word "home" is the object of this sentence?)
7-The girl is going to work. (Can the main verb "work" be called as the object of this sentence?)
8-The man is coming home from work. (Which is the object "home" or "work"?)
9-I go work by bus. (Is the word "bus" is an object?)
10-In fact, he arrived early. (Is there any object?)

Also, could you help me to name objects and subjects in these question sentences.

1-Where does Tom live? (Is the word "Where" the object of this sentence?)
2-Is he going to work here? (Is there any object?)
3-Who lives here? (Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)
4-Who's going to work here? (Is the word "here" the object of this sentence?)
5-Who lives with Tom? (Is the word "Tom" the object of this sentence? Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)

I know there are a lot of questions in my post and I understand if you don't help me. I'm sorry for my long post. I'll be very grateful for any answer you might like to give.
icon7.png
 

Charlie Bernstein

VIP Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Hello, I'm studying [STRIKE]on[/STRIKE] sentence structures, but I'm having some problems. I've watched approximately ten YouTube videos and read four articles, but I couldn't find certain answers for my questions. I would like to know whether collocations, prepositions, prepositional phrases, adjectives, and adverbs can be called [STRIKE]as[/STRIKE] objects.
icon7.png


1-Something happened to me. (Is the word "something" a subject here?)

Yes.

2-She was late. (Can the adverb "late" be called [STRIKE]as[/STRIKE] an object?

I think so, but I'll defer to our grammarians.

Is the pronoun "She" both subject and object?)

It's the subject.


3-He gave a speech at a science conference. ( Can the word "speech" be called as object?

Yes.

Is the prepositional phrase "in science conference" called [STRIKE]as[/STRIKE] an [STRIKE]"[/STRIKE]object[STRIKE]"[/STRIKE] as a whole?)

The object is "speech."


4-Out of stillness came the loud sound of laughter. (I assume the word "sound" is subject here. Is it correct?)

Yes.

5-We danced on the floor. (Can the word "floor" be called as object of the sentence?)

I'll defer to our grammarians on that one.


6-This woman will go home after work. (Is the word "home" [STRIKE]is[/STRIKE] the object of this sentence?)

Yes.

7-The girl is going to work. (Can the main verb "work" be called [STRIKE]as[/STRIKE] the object of this sentence?)

I think the object is the prepositional phrase "to work," but again, let's see what our grammarians say.


8-The man is coming home from work. (Which is the object "home" or "work"?)

Home.

9-I go to work by bus. (Is the word "bus" is an object?)

It looks like "to work" to me. Again: grammarians?


10-In fact, he arrived early. (Is there any object?)

I don't see one.


Also, could you help me to name objects and subjects in these question sentences.

This is too many questions. I'll stop here.


1-Where does Tom live? (Is the word "Where" the object of this sentence?)
2-Is he going to work here? (Is there any object?)
3-Who lives here? (Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)
4-Who's going to work here? (Is the word "here" the object of this sentence?)
5-Who lives with Tom? (Is the word "Tom" the object of this sentence? Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)

I know there are a lot of questions in my post and I understand if you don't help me. I'm sorry for my long post. I'll be very grateful for any answer you might like to give.
icon7.png
We like to discuss one question at a time.
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
You've asked way too many questions for one post.

The answer to your first question is yes.
 

TheParser

VIP Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
2-She was late. (Can the adverb "late" be called as a object? Is the pronoun "She" both subject and object?)
NOT A TEACHER


Freijorn, my books tell me that "late" is a subjective complement.

1. "She" is the subject of that sentence.
2. If someone comes up to you and suddenly says, "She was," you would be confused and ask, "Would you please complete that sentence?"
3. That person would say, "Oh, excuse me. I wanted to tell you that she was late." (The word "complement" comes from the word "complete.")
4. The speaker could complete the sentence with an adjective (such as "late" or "early" or "angry") or with a noun (such as "a lawyer" or "a student" or "a writer").
5. Subjective complements are used after linking verbs. As you know, probably "to be" is the most common linking verb. But there are many others. For example: "She seemed happy."

Source: House and Harman's Descriptive English Grammar (1931), pp. 232-238.
 

freijorn

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Thank you. Is there any comprehensive source that you could suggest me to have in aim to help me to learn which types of words whether can be named as the object?
 

PaulMatthews

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2016
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
Great Britain
Current Location
Great Britain
Thank you. Is there any comprehensive source that you could suggest me to have in aim to help me to learn which types of words whether can be named as the object?
The simple answer is that objects of verbs consist almost entirely of noun phrases.

I suggest you obtain a decent modern text book.
 

TheParser

VIP Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Thank you. Is there any comprehensive source that you could suggest me to have in aim to help me to learn which types of words whether can be named as the object?

NOT A TEACHER

Freijorn, I am pretty sure that you could spend hours on the Internet reading about what constitutes an object.


It can be a rather confusing topic. For example, "Mr. Smith taught me English." Most people would say that "English" is the direct object and "me" is the indirect object. But some books feel that such a sentence has two direct objects. "Mr. Smith teaches me" and "Mr. Smith teaches English." But even those books advise learners to simply follow the traditional custom of using the terms "direct object" and "indirect object."

Source: Pence and Emery, A Grammar of Present-Day English (1947), pages 48-49.
 

freijorn

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
The simple answer is that objects of verbs consist almost entirely of noun phrases.

I suggest you obtain a decent modern text book.

Thanks a lot. I have one last question. As I understand, in the example of “We danced on the floor.”, the prepositional phrase “On the floor.” or the “floor” can’t be called object of sentence right? I learned that “floor” is the object of preposition but I’m not sure whether it’s the object of the whole sentence.
 
Last edited:

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
No, the floor is the complement of the preposition on.

The verb danced doesn't have an object. It's intransitive.
 

freijorn

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Thanks a lot for your precious replies my teachers. I will make more researches on this subject.
 

TheParser

VIP Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
1-Where does Tom live? (Is the word "Where" the object of this sentence?)
2-Is he going to work here? (Is there any object?)
3-Who lives here? (Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)
4-Who's going to work here? (Is the word "here" the object of this sentence?)
5-Who lives with Tom? (Is the word "Tom" the object of this sentence? Is the word "Who" the subject of this sentence?)

NOT A TEACHER


Freijorn, I will give you my opinion. If I have made a mistake, a moderator or another member will correct them.

1. For easier analysis, put the sentence in regular order (only for the sake of analysis): "Tom does live where?" (No object.)

2. For analysis only: "He is going to work here?" No object.

3. No object. Yes, "Who" is the subject. Some teachers remind students to find the verb first. Then it will be easier to find the subject. For example, "Did Sue do her homework?" For analysis only, think "Sue did do her homework?" The verb is "did do." Ask yourself who did do her homework? Answer: "Sue."

4. No object. "Here" is traditionally parsed as an adverb in your sentence. It tells you where she/he works.

5. Yes, "Who" is the subject. "Tom" is parsed as the object of the preposition "with." So we say that the prepositional phrase "with Tom" modifies the verb "lives." For example: "Who lives with her parents?" or "Who lives in that big house?" ("that big house" is the object of the preposition "in").
 

freijorn

Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
NOT A TEACHER


Freijorn, I will give you my opinion. If I have made a mistake, a moderator or another member will correct them.

1. For easier analysis, put the sentence in regular order (only for the sake of analysis): "Tom does live where?" (No object.)

2. For analysis only: "He is going to work here?" No object.

3. No object. Yes, "Who" is the subject. Some teachers remind students to find the verb first. Then it will be easier to find the subject. For example, "Did Sue do her homework?" For analysis only, think "Sue did do her homework?" The verb is "did do." Ask yourself who did do her homework? Answer: "Sue."

4. No object. "Here" is traditionally parsed as an adverb in your sentence. It tells you where she/he works.

5. Yes, "Who" is the subject. "Tom" is parsed as the object of the preposition "with." So we say that the prepositional phrase "with Tom" modifies the verb "lives." For example: "Who lives with her parents?" or "Who lives in that big house?" ("that big house" is the object of the preposition "in").

I thank you so much for your precious reply. It has enlightened lots of things for me.
icon7.png
 
Top