the plural

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julianna

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i know that the plural of "phenomenen" is phenomena.
and medium's is media.
am I wrong?
and can we add "s" to form the plural of these two words??
 

new2grammar

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i know that the plural of "phenomenen" is phenomena.
and medium's is media.
am I wrong?
and can we add "s" to form the plural of these two words??
Kindly note Phenomenon is the plural form of phenomena

and no we can't use 's'
 

rlfwood

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The two plurals that you gave are correct. No, you can't ordinarily form the plural of those words by adding "s" (I can think of a couple of oddball exceptions for the second one, but the rule is generally true).
 

euncu

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Source:Media - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Main Entry: 2media
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural me·di·as
Usage: often attributive
Etymology: plural of medium
Date: 1923

1 : a medium of cultivation, conveyance, or expression; especially : medium 2b
2 a singular or plural in construction : mass media b plural : members of the mass media

usage The singular media and its plural medias seem to have originated in the field of advertising over 70 years ago; they are still so used without stigma in that specialized field. In most other applications media is used as a plural of medium. The popularity of the word in references to the agencies of mass communication is leading to the formation of a mass noun, construed as a singular <there's no basis for it. You know, the news media gets on to something — Edwin Meese 3d> <the media is less interested in the party's policies — James Lewis, Guardian Weekly>. This use is not as well established as the mass-noun use of data and is likely to incur criticism especially in writing.
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Source : http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/phenomena
Main Entry: phe·nom·e·na
Pronunciation: \fi-ˈnä-mə-nə, -ˌnä\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural phe·nom·e·nas
Date: 1576
nonstandard : phenomenon
usage Phenomena has been in occasional use as a singular for more than 400 years and its plural phenomenas for more than 350. Our evidence shows that it is primarily a speech form used by poets, critics, and professors, among others, but one that sometimes turns up in edited prose <the Borgia were, in modern terms, a media phenomenaEconomist>. It is etymologically no more irregular than stamina, agenda, and candelabra, but it has nowhere near the frequency of use that they have, and while they are standard, phenomena is still rather borderline.
 
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