Although

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Hi

How is that possible to have inversion here?
Although there are a myriad of underlying advantages,
 
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Rover_KE

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Please complete the sentence.
 
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Although there are a myriad of underlying advantages, I believe the disadvantages aren’t negligible.
 

TheParser

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Is it possible to have inversion or reduction?

NOT A TEACHER



Hello,

I believe in very elegant English, one could say something like:

"A myriad of underlying advantages though there are, I believe the disadvantages aren't negligible."
 

GoesStation

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NOT A TEACHER



Hello,

I believe in very elegant English, one could say something like:

"A myriad of underlying advantages though there are, I believe the disadvantages aren't negligible."

Sorry, but that doesn't look at all elegant to me. It looks tortured.
 

emsr2d2

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It's not "a myriad of" anything. We just say "myriad".

"Although there are myriad underlying advantages, ..."
 

emsr2d2

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Well, I'll go to the foot of our stairs! My 'O' Level English Language teacher drummed into the class that only "myriad" (adjective) + noun is correct. If I ever bump into her again, I'll have a word!
 

Tarheel

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I would believe Ems over Longman.
 

emsr2d2

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I would believe Ems over Longman.

Thanks for the vote of confidence but a quick Google search told me that both "myriad + noun" and "a myriad of + noun" are apparently acceptable these days.
 

GoesStation

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A myriad of something looks completely natural to me. If Ems gets pushback from her O-level English teacher, I'll be happy to back her up.
 

bubbha

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I was also taught that "a myriad of" is wrong.

Dictionaries can be too descriptivist in my opinion. I think it's a travesty that one notable dictionary has relented and recognized one of the meanings of "literally" to be "figuratively".
 

Tdol

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It's actually quite an old usage, I believe.
 

GoesStation

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It literally goes back centuries.
 
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